Tag Archives: handsaw

New Saw Tote Part 3. . . Yep, I’m in love

Kerf marked in on the new saw tote

Kerf marked in on the new saw tote

The night before last, I marked out the kerf for the sawplate in the new tote.  Yesterday after work, I used my new Veritas Rip Tenon Saw to saw out the kerf.  As a side note, I really am in love with these saws!

Sawing out the kerf

Sawing out the kerf

Kerfed saw tote

Kerfed saw tote

After the kerf was cut, I drilled the holes and counterbored the recesses for the for the saw nuts.  I then drove the male half of the saw nuts into the holes to form the square portions of the holes (see the photo below).

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You may notice a gray streak in the handle from one of the screw holes to the front of the tote.   When I was driving in the saw nuts, the tote cracked along a weak section of the grain.

Cracked tote

Cracked tote

This morning, I started the repairs on the tote.  First, I sawed a kerf along the crack.2013-12-28 10.38.21Next, I mixed up some epoxy with sawdust from the shaping of the tote and filled in the kerf with this mixture to act as a filler.

Crack filled

Crack filled

After the filler had set up, I removed the excess with a sharp chisel and a scraper.  Below is a photo of the repaired tote.

Repaired saw tote

Repaired saw tote

The next step in making the tote is to do the final shaping of the curved edges.  The most critical are to shape is around the grip so that the saw is comfortable to hold and use.  The front and bottom edges of the tote will be shaped as well, but that is more for looks than anything.   My next post in the series will cover the shaping (and hopefully the finishing) of the tote.

Until then. . .

New Saw Tote – Part 2

Rough out the saw tote.

Roughing out the saw tote.

Since last weekend, I had a chance to get some more work done on new saw tote I’m making.  The next step after laying out the tote is to rough out the  shape of the tote.  I’m still getting used to my turning saw (I have a hard time cutting square edges) so I saw a little outside the lines.  As you can see in the photo above, I also bored holes to relieve the some of the curves.    Below is a photo of the rough sawn tote.

Rough sawn tote.

Rough sawn tote.

After roughing out the tote, I used rasps and a float to get it shaped down to the layout lines.  At this point, I try to get all the edges square.  Here are a couple of photos.

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2013-12-26 21.26.29From lumber to this point has taken about 3 hours at this point.  The next step will be to saw the kerf for the saw plate and boring the holes for the saw nuts.  I’ll cover those steps in the next post.

Until next time. . .

 

Saw Restoration

Saw after restoration.

Saw after restoration.

Around Thanksgiving, my Father-in-Law, Dave, mentioned that his handsaws needed to be sharpened.  I told him that I would be happy to sharpen them, so we went out to his workshop to check them out.  One of the saws had a really bad kink in the blade and wasn’t in any condition to be salvaged without a lot of work.  The other was fairly rusted and had a minor kink near the end of the blade, but it wasn’t too bad.

I wish I had taken a picture of this saw before I started working on it.  It was a Craftsman; I think it was probably made in the 1970s or 1980s.  In addition to the kink in the blade, the tote (the proper name for a saw’s handle) was very poorly designed.  It was made of 1″ plywood, and all its proportions were much to large to be usable.  I asked Dave if he wanted me to make a new tote for the saw in addition to sharpening it.  He responded,  “Whatever you want to do.”  That was music to my ears.

I brought this saw home and over the past week and a half, I have been working on restoring it.  First I picked up a nice cherry board from my friend Kurt and started making a new tote.  On Christmas Day, I took the mostly completed tote to see how it fit Dave’s hand.  After finishing the tote, I gave the saw plate a bath in Evapo-rust, a great (and very environmentally friendly) rust remover.

I had talked to Dave on Christmas Eve about what type of wood he expected to cut and what clean-up he usually did after using the saw.  It turns out that the saw wasn’t particularly suited to his needs, so I decided to rework the saw’s cutting geometry.  The first step in this process was to file away all the existing teeth of the saw.  Next, I had to file in new teeth.  Once the new teeth were formed, I sharpened the cutting angles on the teeth.  It took several passes with a file to get the saw good and sharp.

Once the blade was sharp, I cut a groove in the tote for the saw-blade and drilled holes for the saw-nuts that hold the handle to the saw plate.  Next, I put several coats of Watco Danish Oil on the tote; and when it was dry, I put the saw together.

Here is a photo showing both the original tote and the new one.

Saw tote comparison

Saw tote comparison

What do you think of the restoration?  I would love to hear your thoughts?  Also, please let me know if you would like more or less details in future posts.